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  • Rutgers Summer Workshop on Particle Physics and Cosmology From the coordinator at Rutgers:The Physics Department of Rutgers University is currently accepting applications from high school students to participate in the 9th Annual Summer Workshop on Particle Physics ...
    Posted Feb 6, 2019, 11:04 AM by Barbara Fortunato
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Showing posts 1 - 3 of 60. View more »

How do motors work? How do you make your own motor?

posted Jun 10, 2019, 6:12 AM by Barbara Fortunato

2: T 6/18 & W 6/19, 5: M 6/17 & W 6/19, 7: T 6/18 & W 6/19

Today, we'll try to use what we know about generators to try to understand motors.  How are motors and generators the same?  How are they different?  After walking through how motors work as a class, you'll take some time to write a paragraph about how a motor works.  Use your guided explanation of generators as guide to explaining how motors work.  

Then, we'll use some simple tools to create your own motor.  We'll think about what we've learned so far in this unit in order to design an optimal motor given the materials.  

If you missed class, make sure you watch the following video on how motors work:

DC Motor, How it works? (Learn Engineering)

How do generators work?

posted Jun 10, 2019, 6:09 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 10, 2019, 6:12 AM ]

2: F 6/14, 5: F 6/14, 7: M 6/17

Today, we'll take a look at how generators work.  We'll explore some real life generators and do a Thinking Lab about Generators.  By doing this lab, you should have a good idea about how generators work. 

If you are not in class, check out the videos below:

Here's how generators work:

AC Generator (Creative Learning)


Check out this homemade generator:

AC Generator (Michael Melloch)


Homework:  Finish  Thinking Lab about Generators for a grade.

What did you learn this year?

posted Jun 10, 2019, 6:02 AM by Barbara Fortunato

2: Th 6/13, 5: Th 6/13, 7: Th 6/13

Last comprehensive exam today!

Topics for last comprehensive exam:

posted Jun 10, 2019, 4:38 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 10, 2019, 5:59 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: W 6/12, 5: T 6/11, 7: W 6/12

Study.

Exam next class!

  1. Kinematics 
    1. 1-D - equations, cars, freefall, reading graphs x vs. t & v vs. t (ostrich & cheetah)
    2. 2-D - projectile motion, boat problems, airplane problems, adding vectors
  2. Newton's Laws - 
    1. 1st law - conceptual
    2. 2nd law - 
      1. elevators
      2. pulleys
      3. inclined planes
      4. Y string
    3. 3rd law
      1. conceptual
      2. two block
  3. More Newton's Laws - 
    1. Universal Gravitation
    2. Circular Motion
      1. horizontal circles
      2. velocity = circumference / period
      3. vertical circles
  4. Work and Energy - 
    1. Calculating work
    2. Power
    3. Method 1 - Conservation 
      1. before & after diagrams
      2. non-conservative forces
    4. Method 2 - Work-Energy Theorem
    5. Work done by a spring & Hooke's Law
  5. Momentum - 
    1. Impulse
    2. elastic vs. inelastic
    3. conservation - explosions & bullet & car crash problems
    4. Ballistic pendulum
    5. 2-D momentum
  6. Electrostatics 
    1. Electroscope and model of matter
    2. Charging methods - conduction, polarization, induction, friction, lightning, grounding
    3. Electric Force - Coulomb's Law
    4. Electric Field (and lines)
    5. Electric Potential Energy
    6. Electric Potential
    7. all of above in both: point charges & uniform fields
  7. Circuits 
    1. Current def
    2. Ohm's Law
    3. P=IV, brightness
    4. solving series, parallel, and combo circuits
    5. equivalent resistance
    6. ammeters & voltmeters
  8. Electromagnetism 
    1. Magnetism
      1. Right Hand Rules (4) 
      2. representing 3-D space
      3. magnetism basics
    2. Induction
      1. Lenz's Law
      2. magnetic flux
      3. Faraday's Law
    3. Transformers
    4. Motional EMF
    5. motors & generators
  9. Sound - 
    1. Types of waves
    2. Wave anatomy
    3. Wave velocity ( v = f λ )
    4. Wave interference
    5. Standing waves
    6. Resonance in strings, open pipes, and closed pipes

How are transformers useful?

posted Jun 2, 2019, 2:57 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 10, 2019, 4:35 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: F 6/7, 5: F 6/7, 7: F 6/7
2: M 6/10, 5: M 6/10, 7: T 6/11

Practice QUIZ on Lenz's Law TODAY!   This will not count for a grade.  You don't need to make this one up if you miss it, but you can if you want.  

Today, we'll see how transformers work and how they can be useful.   We'll use Faraday's Law of Induction to derive the relationships between primary/secondary numbers of coils, voltage, and current in ideal transformers.  

This video helps to explain how a transformer works (in case you miss class)

How transformers work (t33chin)


You can check out this demo to see a transformer in action:

Transformer Desktop Demo

See what's inside a real high voltage transformer:

Inside a high voltage transformer


Presentation:  Electromagnetic Induction Presentation continued
Homework:  Do page 2 of FYP: Electromagnetism if you have not finished already.  Then, review concepts from last unit on circuits to answer questions about Power Lost in the Transport of Power.  Imagine the circuit in the questions is an AC circuit with two resistors as shown below:

Unit Test (extra cumulative) on Thursday, June 13th!

How much current can you produce by moving a conductive bar in a magnetic field?

posted Jun 2, 2019, 2:53 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 5, 2019, 10:00 AM ]

2: Th 6/6, 5: W 6/5, 7: Th 6/6

Today, we'll take a look at a moving bar in a magnetic field which will produce a motional emf.  Using what we learned last time about Faraday's Law, we'll derive an equation that can help you understand this relationship.  (Faraday's Lawε = -N ΔΦ/Δt and I = ε/R (Ohm's Law)).

With any time remaining in the period, we'll start working homework below.

Presentation:  Electromagnetic Induction Presentation continued
Homework:  Practice QUIZ on Lenz's Law next class - Friday, June 7th!   This will not count for a grade.  You don't need to make this one up if you miss it, but you can if you want.  Read any sections in chapter 20 that seem unclear.  Do textbook chapter 20 Exercises (page 725) #1, 3, 7, 9, 13 and check answers in the back of the book.  Write down any questions you might have and bring them up at the beginning of next class.  Then do at least #11-12 of page 2 of FYP: Electromagnetism  (ANSWERSif you have not finished. The video below will help you with these two problems.  

Motional EMF


Can we solve the energy crisis? How do you use Lenz's Law?

posted Jun 2, 2019, 10:23 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 2, 2019, 3:39 PM ]

2: T 6/4, 5: T 6/4, 7: W 6/5

Today, we'll review what we learned about Lenz's Law last time and do a few examples.  Then we'll see if we can perpetually create a current in a loop of wire with only a little bit of work to start out.  

We'll watch a few cool videos:

Magnet brakes its own fall

Wireless Electricity

Levitating Barbecue! Electromagnetic Induction

Then, we'll introduce the quantitative formula for flux in a uniform magnetic field; ΦB = BAcosθ.  We'll see how we can quantify the current created by a changing magnetic flux in a loop by looking at Faraday's Lawε = -N ΔΦ/Δt where I = ε/R (Ohm's Law).

Presentation:  Electromagnetic Induction Presentation continued
Homework:  Finish finding your real life example of electromagnets or electromagnetic induction, and upload to either Google Classroom or Flipgrid.  Optionally, try this for practice:  Magnetism Practice Quiz and check Answers.  Finally, write a few sentences to explain how this works:

Lenz's Law Levitation

How do we determine the direction of induced current flow?

posted May 31, 2019, 11:29 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jun 2, 2019, 8:48 AM ]

2: M 6/3, 5: M 6/3, 7: M 6/3

Right Hand Rules QUIZ Today!

Then after the quiz, if moving charges produce magnetic fields, can magnetic fields move charges?  Today, we'll learn how we can produce a current in a wire loop by changing the magnetic field through it.  

Today, we'll introduce Lenz's Law and look at 3 (or really 4) steps:
  • Is there a changing magnetic flux in the loop of wire?
  • How are the field lines changing? ("more/less lines to the right" for example)
  • The induced field opposes that change.  ("more lines _____")
  • Use the right hand rule for the electromagnet/solenoid.  (thumb = induced field, fingers curl = current)
We'll do some practice with Lenz's Law and talk about modern applications.

Presentation:  Electromagnetic Induction Presentation
Homework:  Read Section 20.1 in your textbook.  You do not need to know any of the formulas in this section, just understand Lenz's Law.

How do you help your classmates study right hand rules? How do we determine the direction of induced current flow?

posted May 26, 2019, 10:32 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated May 28, 2019, 2:44 PM ]

2: F 5/31, 5: Th 5/50, 7: F 5/31

Today, we'll see some demos and do a challenge problem to test our knowledge of the right hand rules.  With this inspiration, we'll write some sample quiz questions which will help our classmates study for the right hand rules quiz next class.  You'll post your questions on Google Classroom, and the link to the folder will be shared at 6pm Friday when the assignment is due.

Then, if moving charges produce magnetic fields, can magnetic fields move charges?  Today, we'll learn how we can produce a current in a wire loop by changing the magnetic field through it.  

Today, we'll introduce Lenz's Law and look at 3 (or really 4) steps:
  • Is there a changing number of magnetic field lines in the loop of wire?
  • How are the field lines changing? ("more/less lines to the right" for example)
  • The induced field opposes that change.  ("more lines _____")
  • Use the right hand rule for the electromagnet/solenoid.  (thumb = induced field, fingers curl = current)
We'll do some practice with Lenz's Law.
Homework:  Quiz on all four right hand rules next class - Monday, June 3rd. Quiz includes one numerical calculation question.

How are magnetic fields formed?

posted May 26, 2019, 10:30 AM by Barbara Fortunato

2: W 5/29, 5: W 5/29, 7: Th 5/30

Today, we'll learn how moving charges create magnetic fields.  We'll learn the last two right hand rules.  We'll see a couple of demonstrations with iron filings and current carrying wires.  With any time remaining, you'll work on FYP: Electromagnetism #1-10 if you have not finished or you can start your homework.  

Homework:  Read the rest of chapter 19 - sections 19.6, the first section of 19.7 (skip Electromagnets and Magnetic Permeability), and 19.8.  You will not be responsible for any of the equations in these sections.  Then do conceptual questions 17-19, 21-24, and 26  (p 688). (answersQuiz on all four right hand rules on Monday, June 3rd.

If you need help understanding the right hand rules for a magnetic field CREATED by a current carrying wire, watch the following video:

Magnetic Field Electric Current RHR (Mrs. Twu)

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