Honors Physics

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Lesson objectives in Orange.

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  • Pirates Against Hunger Donation Drive Please see below for a message from the Pirates Against Hunger club. They would like everyone to spread the word about their donation drive. It ends next Friday, April 27 ...
    Posted Apr 20, 2018, 7:23 AM by Barbara Fortunato
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    Posted Feb 22, 2018, 6:08 AM by Barbara Fortunato
Showing posts 1 - 3 of 53. View more »

What is magnetism? How do electrical charges interact with magnets?

posted Apr 13, 2018, 1:38 PM by Barbara Fortunato

5: F 4/20, 7: M 4/23

Today, we'll introduce the idea of magnetism with several demonstrations. We'll learn how magnetic fields and electrical charges interact. We'll learn the formula for force on a moving charge in a magnetic field.  We'll also learn the right hand rule to figure out the direction of the force.  Finally, we'll learn about the shape of the path of a moving charge in a magnetic field and how to quantify it.  We'll discuss an application of this concept.

Homework: If you have not done so already, skim through sections 19.1-19.3 on pages 657-667 in your textbook. Answer conceptual questions 4-7 (p 689) and exercises 5, 7, and 9.

How well do you understand circuits?

posted Apr 13, 2018, 1:36 PM by Barbara Fortunato

5: Th 4/19, 7: Th 4/19

Circuits Exam TODAY!

Homework:  PRead sections 19.1-19.3 on pages 657-667 in your textbook. Answer conceptual questions 4-7 (p 689) and exercises 5, 7, and 9

How do you tackle a circuit that is not simply in series or parallel?

posted Apr 13, 2018, 1:32 PM by Barbara Fortunato

5: T 4/17, 7: W 4/18

Today, we'll start by going over simple series and parallel circuits.  I'll take any questions you have on last night's homework.  

Then, we'll look at what happens when we combine series and parallel circuits. Remember that the current is the same through a series circuit, while the voltage drop is the same across every element of a parallel circuit.  We'll finish page 5 of HP Circuits Packet.
 
HomeworkStudy for Circuits Test NEXT CLASS - Thursday, April 19th.  

How do you solve problems with series and parallel circuits?

posted Apr 13, 2018, 1:26 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Apr 13, 2018, 1:28 PM ]

5: M 4/16, 7: T 4/17

Today, we'll continue learning about the circuits we learned about last time.  We'll take a look at what it means to have resistors in series and in parallel.  We'll try to analyze series and parallel circuits with power and equivalent resistance.  We'll see a demonstration which will help us construct understanding of how parallel circuits are different from series circuits, followed by a deriving the formula for equivalent resistance in series and parallel circuits.  

Homework:  page 4 of HP Circuits Packet

How does a light bulb work? What happens when we have more than one circuit element?

posted Apr 11, 2018, 5:03 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Apr 13, 2018, 1:22 PM ]

5: F 4/13, 7: F 4/13

Today, we'll first go over the results of your lab, and review the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance, which we call Ohm's Law. We'll also review the general equation for power and the equations for power lost in a resistor.
 
Then, we will start to look at more complex circuits - where circuit elements such as light bulbs are connected in series and parallel. We will observe a demonstration of series and parallel light bulb circuits and qualitatively analyze the effects on the brightness of the bulbs. We will try to determine what is happening in the circuit using our knowledge of voltage, current, and resistance.  We'll also learn how to draw schematic diagrams of circuits in order to help us communicate our ideas.

PresentationLight bulbs, Power, and Series & Parallel Circuits
Homework: page 4 of HP Circuits Packet.  none

What is Ohm's Law? How do you calculate power dissipated by a resistor?

posted Apr 11, 2018, 4:56 AM by Barbara Fortunato

5: W 4/11, 7: W 4/11

I won't be in class today - I'll be administering a physics contest in the library all afternoon.  Today, start by finishing the lab we started last class.  Discuss with your classmates the results of your lab, and ascertain the proportionality relationship between voltage, current, and resistance, which we call Ohm's Law.  (You should be able to write down the relationship as a proportionality with all three variables.)  Then do these Basic Ohm's Law and Power Problems which will be collected by the sub-study teacher.  There is information in this packet about what you should have gained from the lab in addition to information about how to calculate the power output of a circuit element.   

Homework:  Write down any questions you have about the work you did in sub-study, and finish any problems from the last page you did not get to on a separate sheet of paper.  If you still have not completed the lab graphs and analysis of the data for proportionality relationships between resistance, voltage and current, do so on the graph paper provided.  This lab will be collected and graded next time.  

What makes an electric circuit? What is the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance?

posted Mar 30, 2018, 11:10 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Apr 9, 2018, 10:40 AM ]

5: T 4/10, 7: W 4/11 M 4/9

Today, we’ll start Unit 9 and talk about what makes current flow. We’ll talk about how circuits relate to the concepts of electric fields and electric potential.  Then, we'll do a lab where you will construct the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance.

Presentation:  Electric Current Introduction
Homework:  Finish your lab graphs, transforming if necessary.  Put your graphs in a Google Sheets file on Google Classroom.  Then come up with a proportionality relationship between voltage, current, and resistance.  (Does not need to include coefficient.)
If you missed the lab or have questions about what you should get for the V vs. I graph, then watch the following video:

Ohm's Law (Smart Learning for All)

For those of you missing the lab, you'll have to make up the lab with this simulation:

How can we improve our understanding of electrostatics?

posted Mar 30, 2018, 11:06 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Apr 9, 2018, 10:39 AM ]

5: M 4/9, 7: M 4/9 Th 4/12

Today, we'll work on our test corrections for the electrostatics exam.  Then, you'll peer assess the work of your classmates on the Electrostatics Concept/Thinking Maps and vote on your favorites.  

Homework: Finish peer assessing at least 8 groups and vote in Google Classroom after perusing the rest.

How well do you understand electrostatics?

posted Mar 25, 2018, 5:07 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Mar 25, 2018, 5:08 AM ]

5: W 3/28, 7: W 3/28

EXAM on Electrostatics Today!

Homework:  No Homework Spring Break.

How well can you show understanding of electrostatics?

posted Mar 25, 2018, 5:03 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Mar 25, 2018, 5:06 AM ]

5: M 3/26 (scroll down for T 3/27), 7: M 3/26

I will not be in school today.  In sub-study, choose one of the following options:
  1. Work on your project that is due to Google Classroom tonight.
  2. Finish Electrostatics Example Problems - it is very important to complete this before the test.  Solutions in earlier post.
  3. Work on textbook problems from Chapters 15 & 16 - see Google Classroom for details.
  4. Work on More Electrostatics Example Problems.  
  5. Work on other problems you can find online.
Homework:  Study for Unit test on electrostatics scheduled for Wednesday, March 28th.  If you know you are leaving for vacation early, please email me to reschedule your test for BEFORE you leave.  

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