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  • Physics conference for HS women and teachers @ TCNJ From the organizer:Hi all,   The College of New Jersey is very excited to announce that registration is now open for the high school student and teacher session for CUWiP ...
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What if you pull or push a block at an angle?

posted Dec 11, 2018, 11:24 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 17, 2018, 7:11 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: Th 12/20, 5: Th 12/20, 7: Th 12/20

QUIZ on adding vector forces and inclined planes QUIZ and LAB QUIZ on Y-tension lab TODAY.

Today, we'll look at one other kind of problem - we pull or push a block at an angle.  We'll see that when we do this, the normal force is NOT equal to the force of gravity!  We'll try to finish Friction & Vector Forces during class.

Homework:  Periods 2 & 5, finish Friction & Vector Forces .   Period 7, have a good break!  

How do pulleys work with inclined planes?

posted Dec 11, 2018, 11:18 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: W 12/19, 5: T 12/18, 7: W 12/19

Today, we'll try some even harder pulley problems.  If you need some ideas on how to approach these problems, you can watch the video below, but don't forget to write a ΣF statement in the y-direction to get your normal force for the mass on the incline.

Pulley on an incline with friction (Michel van Biezen)

 
Handout:  Table Top Pulley Problems, Solutions #3-4
Homework:   QUIZ on adding vector forces and inclined planes and LAB QUIZ on Y-tension lab - Thursday, December 20th.  (Pulley problems not included on quiz.)  Finish Table Top Pulley Problems #3-4. LAB QUIZ on Friction 2 lab on Friday, January 4th.

How can you account for friction on an inclined plane?

posted Dec 11, 2018, 11:15 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: M 12/17, 5: M 12/17, 7: T 12/18

Today, we'll perform a lab to check our understanding of friction and inclined planes.  Check Google Classroom for details.   You'll be collaborating with your lab group on a formal lab report where you'll be communicating finding two different methods for finding the coefficient of static friction.  

Handout:  Mu Shoe Lab
Homework
:  QUIZ on adding vector forces and inclined planes and LAB QUIZ on Y-tension lab.- Thursday, December 20th LAB QUIZ on Friction 2 lab on Friday, January 4th.

What is the best coordinate system choice for inclined plane problems?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:43 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 17, 2018, 8:07 AM ]

2: F 12/14, 5: F 12/14, 7: F 12/14
 
Lab quiz today on Y-tension lab  POSTPONED.

Today, we’ll look at how we can apply what we know about vectors in two dimensions to inclined plane problems. The key to inclined plane problems is picking a coordinate system that makes sense.  We must shift our thinking from a traditional horizontal-vertical coordinate system to a slanted coordinate system.  We'll start with a practice assessment based on the video you watched for homework last night.  If you did not watch the video, you'll watch it during this time.  We'll extend the discussion to link to our inclined plane lab that we performed a long time ago.  We'll talk about what factors affect the motion of an object on an inclined plane theoretically and in real life.

With any time remaining, work on page 6 #1-4 only of the Newton's Second Law packet which are also for homework. 
 
HomeworkLab quiz on Y-tension lab next class. Do page 6 #1-4 only of the Newton's Second Law packet.   You may check Solutions to Inclined Plane Problems #1-4, but try them on your own first!  Also, watch the rest of the video, and think about questions that I pose in the last 5 minutes.  

Inclined Planes


How can you find the mass of a mystery object using tension at an angle?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:41 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 13, 2018, 6:19 PM ]

2: Th 12/13, 5: W 12/12, 7: Th 12/13

Today, we'll look at how Newton's Second Law acts in two dimensions by performing a lab where we try to find the mass of a mystery object using two dimensional forces.  See below for set-up


If you have any trouble understanding the calculations here, check out the following video below.  The strategy is to draw a free body diagram of the knot.  (If the knot is made out of ideal or massless string, it does not have a force of gravity on it.)  

Static equilibrium Y-Tension ‎(Michael van Biezen)‎



Homework:  Lab quiz next class (Friday) on Y-tension labFinish your lab write-up in your lab notebook.  Answer the following questions as part of your analysis:  (1) As you pulled the strings so that the angle between the strings increased, how did the tensions change?  (2) Is it possible to pull the strings so that both strings are horizontal?  Why or why not?  Then watch at least the first 19 minutes of the video below the homework section.  Take notes while you watch, and utilize the pause and rewind buttons as needed.  In this video, we’ll look at how we can apply what we know about vectors in two dimensions to inclined plane problems. The key to inclined plane problems is picking a coordinate system that makes sense.  We must shift our thinking from a traditional horizontal-vertical coordinate system to a slanted coordinate system.  

Inclined Planes

What are component vectors? How can we use them to add vectors?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:39 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 11, 2018, 7:28 AM ]

2: T 12/11, 5: T 12/11, 7: W 12/12
 
Today, we'll see how we can add vectors that are not at right angles to each other.  We will learn to break vectors into x- and y- components and why that is useful to us.  Do Chapter 3 Problem #29.  Then start your homework in groups.

Homework:  Do Chapter 3 #22, 26, 38, 43 on vector addition.  Solutions.  If you'd like to review more on vector addition, you can watch this video (Ignore i-hat & j-hat notation):

Vectors & Scalars (Educator.com)


How well do you understand Newton's Laws?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:35 AM by Barbara Fortunato

2: M 12/10, 5: M 12/10, 7: M 12/10

Unit 3 Exam Today on Newton's Laws in one-dimension.

Homework:  Work on  your Newton's Second Law lab!

How do you study for the Newton's Laws test?

posted Nov 28, 2018, 5:09 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 2, 2018, 3:37 PM ]

2: F 12/7, 5: Th 12/6, 7: F 12/7

Today, we'll start with corrections to the Newton's Second Law quiz, so that you know what you need to work on.  Don't forget to do your usual reflection (aka metacognition).  Then, we'll discuss studying strategies that will help you with every test.  Finally, if there's time, you can practice these study strategies and do some practice problems.

HomeworkStudy for Newton's Laws Unit Test next class - Monday, December 10th.  All tests are cumulative.  

What do we now know about our Newton's Second Law lab?

posted Nov 28, 2018, 5:02 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 5, 2018, 7:44 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

2: W 12/5, 5: W 12/5, 7: Th 12/6

Today, we'll have the Chromebook cart so that you can revise your Newton's Second Law lab that we performed last month.  You should have a new perspective on your results! As a group, you will add a theoretical analysis to the lab including free body diagrams and proportionality constant.  You will additionally be submitting an individual error analysis now that you have more skill and knowledge.  

Homework:  Finish your Newton's Second Law lab revision and error analysis.  Unit Test on Monday, December 10th.  All tests are cumulative.

How well do you understand Newton's Second Law? How do you do more Newton's Law problems?

posted Nov 28, 2018, 4:55 AM by Barbara Fortunato

2: T 12/4, 5: T 12/4, 7: T 12/4

QUIZ Today on simple Newton's Second Law problems, including elevator and friction.

After the quiz, we'll do some catch up on problems you have not yet completed.  If you have already completed all of the assigned problems, then work on some more problems from chapter 4 in the textbook.  (Only problems without trig will be tested.)

Homework:  Finish all assigned problems from the unit.

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