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  • PhysicsBowl 2020 Interested in participating in a fun physics contest for prizes, bragging rights, and fun? If so, fill out the form below, and get $6 to me by Monday, February 3rd ...
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Showing posts 1 - 3 of 63. View more »

How well do you understand work and energy?

posted Feb 17, 2020, 3:41 PM by Barbara Fortunato

6: Th 2/20, 8: Th 2/20
 
Unit 6 Work and Energy EXAM Today!

Homework:  TBD depending on how far we got in lab.

What quantities are conserved in collisions?

posted Feb 17, 2020, 3:38 PM by Barbara Fortunato

6: T 2/18, 8: W 2/19

Today, we'll start a lab where we investigate conserved quantities in collisions.  We'll use our most high tech Vernier carts and your Chromebooks to take data.  You'll debate the historic ideas of Descartes and Leibniz.  Which of the following quantities are conserved in collisions?
  • mass x speed
  • mass x velocity
  • mass x speed squared
See Google Classroom for details.  

Homework: Study for Exam on Work & Energy  next class - Thursday, February 20th.  

What is power? How can we calculate our own horse power?

posted Feb 8, 2020, 12:23 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Feb 17, 2020, 1:28 PM ]

6: Th 2/13, 8: T 2/18

Today, we'll learn about power. Power is defined as work per unit time. We'll do a lab to calculate our own horsepower while climbing the stairs.  In class, you'll finish back page of horsepower lab and read this brief article on horsepower to help you understand it.

Handout:  Power Lab (you'll only be calculating your own power - three trial times only)
Homework: Finish Work, Energy, and Power Review Problems.  Page 1 SOLUTIONS.  Exam on Work & Energy  - Thursday, February 20th.  We'll start new material next class.   

How do you solve conservation of energy problems?

posted Feb 8, 2020, 12:20 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Feb 9, 2020, 4:44 AM ]

6: W 2/12, 8: W 2/12

Three quizzes TODAY - (1) Quiz on conservation of energy problems (no springs), (2) Lab quiz on pendulum, & (3) Lab quiz on springs.  

Then if there's time, we'll continue studying elastic potential energy by watching these videos by Dan Fullerton if you have not yet done so: 

Springs and Hooke's Law (Dan Fullerton)


Watch examples during time 7:45-11:05 only, unless you want more practice with other conservation of energy problems.

Conservation of Energy (Dan Fullerton)


Finally, here's a more complex example like what you'll see on the test. (Think about how you'd do this with our Before & After diagram and our conservation of energy equation. Remember that the spring force is a conservative force.)

Physics - Mechanics: Energy, Work and Power (Michael van Biezen)


Then work on the problems in Work, Energy, and Power Review Problems Page 1 SOLUTIONS.  If you finish all of those, you may try some additional problems from PedersonScience.com.  
 
Handouts:  Work, Energy, and Power Review Problems 
Homework:  Make sure you've done a great deal of the problems above.  The purpose is to identify where you might be struggling.  If you have any questions, bring them up next class. Work, Energy, and Power Review Solutions (page 2 only). Test on Work and energy on Thursday, February 20th. 

How do you solve energy problems with springs?

posted Feb 8, 2020, 12:15 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Feb 8, 2020, 12:26 PM ]

6: M 2/10, 8: T 2/11
 
Today, we'll start by going over the concept of elastic potential energy and homework problems Chapter 5 #44, 49, 56, 57.  Then, we'll review for the test by working on problems in your lab groups.  
 
Handouts:  Work, Energy, and Power Review Problems
Homework:  Three quizzes next class - Wednesday, February 2/12 - (1) Quiz on conservation of energy problems (no springs), (2) Lab quiz on pendulum, & (3) Lab quiz on springs.  Make sure you've done a great deal of the problems above.  The purpose is to identify where you might be struggling.  If you have any questions, bring them up next class.  Test on Work and Energy on Thursday, February 20th. 

If for some reason you missed class today or you need a review, check out the following videos from Dan Fullerton:

Springs and Hooke's Law (Dan Fullerton)


Watch examples during time 7:45-11:05 only, unless you want more practice with other conservation of energy problems.

Conservation of Energy (Dan Fullerton)


Finally, here's a more complex example like what you'll see on the test. (Think about how you'd do this with our Before & After diagram and our conservation of energy equation. Remember that the spring force is a conservative force.)

Physics - Mechanics: Energy, Work and Power (Michael van Biezen)


What is the force that a spring applies?

posted Feb 5, 2020, 5:46 AM by Barbara Fortunato

6: F 2/7, 8: M 2/10
 
Today, we’ll see how springs behave and learn about Hooke’s Law through an exploratory lab. In the lab, you’ll try to answer the following questions:
  1. Is the force that a spring applies constant?
  2. If so, what is the force for a given spring? If not, how does the force change?
  3. Is there energy associated with a spring? In other words, can a spring do work?
  4. If so, how can you calculate the work done by a spring?

Homework:  Make sure that you complete your lab graph.  Attempt to answer the lab questions above.  You can put the answers to these on the back of the half piece of graph paper I gave you.  I will collect these little pieces of paper.  Read in your textbook Section 5.2 on pp. 147-149.  Try problems from Chapter 5 #44, 49, 56, 57.  Quiz on conservation of energy problems (not including springs) on Wednesday, February 12th.  Unit test on work and energy on Thursday, February 20th, but we'll start new material before then.  

How do we solve complex work and energy problems?

posted Feb 5, 2020, 5:31 AM by Barbara Fortunato

6: Th 2/6, 8: Th 2/6

Today, we’ll tackle some more challenging work & energy problems in lab groups. What you should focus on is drawing your before & after diagrams. Although many of these problems can be solved with kinematics, it's often easier to solve them with energy.  As much as you are tempted to fall back on solving with forces, strengthen your skill by solving with work and energy.

Solve problems from Energy Text Worksheets side B (page 2).  If you finish, you can start on Work, Energy, and Power Review Problems page 2 only.

HandoutEnergy Text WorksheetsWork, Energy, and Power Review Problems.
HomeworkEnergy Text Worksheets - Try to finish all of side B, but at least do up to #8.  Make sure you have a before and after diagram for each problem... a before and after diagram labels what kinds of energy exist at the beginning and at the end, it's not just a picture of the problem.  Don't forget to label where Ug = 0 in your diagram.  Then write a statement of conservation of energy.  
SolutionsCheck out my solutions to ETW-B!  In #1, I should have written that the work done by the resistive force of the water was F h2cosθ, and since θ should have been 180 degrees, the answer F should have been positive (actually just a magnitude) and pointing up.  Also, ETW-A #5 solution.

How does a nonconservative force affect total mechanical energy?

posted Feb 4, 2020, 7:40 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Feb 11, 2020, 5:32 PM ]

6: T 2/4, 8: W 2/5

Today, we will look at some problems where we can use our knowledge of kinetic and gravitational potential energy to solve complex kinematics problems. Conservation of energy is a useful tool and a alternative to using Newton's Laws and kinematics. Remember that work and energy are scalar quantities.

HomeworkWork & Energy Packet page 4 #1-5 (Solutions to FYP: Energy). If you’re having trouble with these problems, read the chapter in the textbook.  Pendulum Lab Quiz  - Monday, February 10th Also, assessment quiz on simplest conservation of energy problems on Monday, February 10th!

What is interesting about the conservation of energy?

posted Feb 3, 2020, 9:25 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Feb 5, 2020, 10:35 AM ]

6: M 2/3, 8: T 2/4

Today, we'll start by finishing the lab from last time.  Then, we'll discover the interesting thing about the conservation of energy by doing a few problems which will require you to remember everything you have learned so far this year.  We will learn that there are usually a few different ways of solving physics problems - with forces and kinematics or with work and energy.  We will discover when it is best to use either strategy.  

Homework: Lab quiz on Thursday, February 6th!   Work & Energy Packet - page 3 only  (Unit 6 CompuSheets Answers)

How are work and energy related?

posted Jan 27, 2020, 6:11 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Jan 30, 2020, 4:01 AM ]

6: F 1/31, 8: F 1/31

Today, we'll do a lab where we investigate how work and energy are related.  You'll observe how energy transformations occur in a simple pendulum.  You'll learn to use a Vernier photogate timer to find the velocity of the pendulum.  Here's the setup:

Raise the pendulum mass to a height above its lowest (equilibrium) position.  Release and measure the velocity as it passes through its lowest position.  Repeat for at least 6 different release heights.  Graph velocity (m/s) vs. release height (m).  Find the mathematical relationship between velocity and release height, linearizing the graph if necessary.

Answer the following analysis questions in your lab notebooks:
  1. How much work do you do in raising the the pendulum mass?
  2. What forces are on the pendulum as it swings down to equilibrium position?  (Draw a free body diagram.)  How much work does each of the forces do?
  3. Write a sentence or two about how mechanical energy is transformed from one form to another.
  4. Describe the shape of the velocity vs. height graph.  What does this say about the relationship between velocity and release height. 
  5. What is the theoretical value of the coefficient in your equation?  How does it compare with your experimentally found coefficient?
  6. What assumptions did you make in your experiment?  How would these assumptions affect your coefficient that you found in your mathematical relationship?
  7. What is the role of the mass of the pendulum in your equation?  Would a better determination of the value of this mass improve the accuracy or precision of this experiment? 

Homework:  If you have not finished the analysis for the Pendulum Lab, please finish it for homework.  Lab quiz next Thursday, February 6th.  

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