Advanced Topics in Physics

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How do electric fields of conductors differ from insulators?

posted Dec 14, 2018, 5:32 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 14, 2018, 10:13 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

F 12/21

Daily Quiz: Gauss's Law for spheres and cylinders

Today, we'll do some problems which involve finding the electric fields in and around conductors and insulators. Chapter 22: 
    Required:  22, 28, 34 

Homework:  Have a restful break!  Quiz on electric fields (point charges, continuous distribution integral, and Gauss's Law) on Monday, January 7th.

How can we use Gauss's Law to determine the value of electric field?

posted Dec 14, 2018, 5:31 AM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 14, 2018, 7:24 AM by Barbara Fortunato ]

W 12/19

Today, we'll recap how to use Gauss's Law for a conducting sphere.  We'll then talk about why the electric field inside a conductor is always zero (in an electrostatic case anyway) by looking at what happens when we put a piece of metal inside an electric field.
 
Then, do problems from Chapter 22:
    Required:  3-7, 21, 27, 29, 30

Homework:  Watch the following videos on finding the electric field inside a spherical insulator.  

Gauss's Law Insulating Sphere

What is flux?

posted Dec 14, 2018, 5:30 AM by Barbara Fortunato

T 12/18 lab

Today, we'll start lab by continuing problems from the last post.

Then, we'll review electric field line by playing with an online applet (Falstad 2-D Electrostatic Fields).  We'll explore the concept of flux.  We'll talk about what flux is in general, and we'll figure out how to represent electric flux.  Then, we'll go back to the online applet which will help us to understand even more about flux.  

Handout:  Flux Using Applet
Homework: Finish the worksheet which was given out in class today. Then, watch the following two videos on Gauss's Law:  part 1 & part 2 - sorry these are not embedded per the wishes of the author lasseviren1

How do you calculate the electric field due to a continuous distribution of charge?

posted Dec 14, 2018, 5:26 AM by Barbara Fortunato

M 12/17

Today, we'll start with a daily quiz.  Then, do some problems which require us to calculate the electric field due to a continuous distribution of charge:  
     Required:  Electric field integrals #2 only, 1981E2, redo Example 21-10 (p. 559), and state why the book chose to solve with d(theta) rather than dy.  Also, Chapter 21 #44, 45, 46, 48
    Enrichment: 43, 47, 49

Homework:  Finish required problems above.  Read this page on Electric Field Lines from The Physics Classroom.  Make sure that you understand the rules for drawing electric field lines.

How can you characterize the electrostatic interaction? How do you define an electric field?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:29 AM by Barbara Fortunato

W 12/12b (2nd half of lab), Th 12/13
 
Today, after a daily quiz, we'll tackle some problems on electric fields due to point charges from Chapter 21:
    Required: 37a, 38, 39, 40a, 41,  1981B32006aB3
    Enrichment:  Go on to problems below.  

Then, we'll continue to do some problems involving multiple point charges during the second hour.  (Note that these are from the AP Physics B test.  The C test questions will be more difficult, but this is a review of what you should have learned last year.)
    Required 2:  2000E2 (a-b), 1975B22002bB52003bB42006bB3 
You must do all of the parts of the problems which have to do with electric force and field, including the motion of a particle in the field.  Parts that have to do with potential energy, work, or potential are optional for now, but if you finish early, then try to remember how to do these parts.  

Homework:  If you need to review last night's video, make sure you do so.  Then watch this video on calculating the electric field due to a continuous distribution of charge.

Electric field integral


How well do you understand rotational mechanics?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:28 AM by Barbara Fortunato

W 12/12a (first hour of lab)

Rotation Exam TODAY!

Homework:  Watch the following video:

Electric Force and Fields

How can you summarize rotation?

posted Dec 10, 2018, 7:28 AM by Barbara Fortunato

T 12/12

Today, we'll talk about the formulas we've been studying and looking at the constraints to using these formulas. With any time remaining, we'll work on AP practice problems.  Make sure to start timing yourself - each problem should only take you 15 minutes.  

Homework:  Do as many AP problems as you can.  Rotation Test next class - Wednesday.  Topics include:  static equilibrium, tipping, center of mass and moment of inertia integrals, rotational kinematics, torque, rotational energy, angular momentum.

What is gyroscopic precession? How can you summarize rotation?

posted Nov 25, 2018, 4:44 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 2, 2018, 10:28 AM ]

F 12/7

Today, we'll start class by preparing for your test on Tuesday.  You'll first read through your statements of metacognition (aka reflections) from this unit.  Based on what you think you do well and what you need to work on, and keeping in mind all of your other social and extracurricular commitments for this weekend, you'll write a concrete action plan for yourself for studying for Tuesday's test.  

Then, you'll review the topics of angular momentum and torque in order to understand the idea of gyroscopic precession. You'll see several demonstrations and try to explain them.  You'll observe the behavior of a top or gyroscope and write down your qualitative observations during its spin. You'll use what you know to work collaboratively in small groups to derive a formula for angular velocity of precession.  The following might be useful to your derivation depending on how you approach it:  The "small angle approximation" states that for small angles measured in radians (those less than about 10°), θ ≈ sin θ ≈ tan θ. (This approximation comes from the truncation of the Taylor series of the trig functions, if you've already studied that in math class.)
Image result for small angle approximation


Finally, as output to Google Classroom or Flipgrid, you'll do one of the following:
  • Find a real-life application of gyroscopes or gyroscopic precession.  (There are examples from earth science, space science, transportation, sports, technology, and lots of other topics.)  Include a picture or diagram in your document or video.  Explain how the topic is related to gyroscopes or gyroscopic precession.  Finally, explain using your findings that you can improve the performance or how other things can take advantage of the gyroscopic effects.
  • Imagine you're a toy designer.  Spinning top sales are down.  Use your knowledge of gyroscope or gyroscopic precession and your creativity to design a brand new toy that will boost spinning top sales, and explain how the toy utilizes gyroscopes or gyroscopic precession.  Include a sketch or diagram of your new toy.  
With any time remaining, we'll work on AP practice problems. 

Homework:  Rotation Test next class - Tuesday, December 11th.  Do as many AP problems as you can while following your studying action plan that you designed.  As you study, make sure to start timing yourself - each problem should only take you 15 minutes.  Topics include:  static equilibrium, tipping, center of mass and moment of inertia integrals, rotational kinematics, torque, rotational energy, angular momentum.

Also, if you're curious about today's lesson, check out this cool application and see if you can explain it:

Antigravity Wheel? (Veritasium)


How well can you solve rotation questions?

posted Nov 25, 2018, 4:42 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Nov 26, 2018, 7:19 AM ]

Th 12/4 lab

Today, you'll continue to play catch up with rotation problems.  If you have not yet done Ch 10 #81, Ch 11 #25, 35, 36, 39, then work on those.  Also, if you have not yet completed  1980M3, make sure you do that.  Make sure all other required problems are completed.  

Then, we'll talk about the formulas we've been studying and looking at the constraints to using these formulas. As you start doing practice AP problems, make sure to start timing yourself - each problem should only take you 15 minutes.  

HomeworkFinish Hula-Hoop Problem and all required problems.  Rotation Exam on Tuesday, December 11th

How can we extend the idea of rolling to more complex problems?

posted Nov 25, 2018, 4:39 PM by Barbara Fortunato   [ updated Dec 2, 2018, 3:41 PM ]

W 12/5

LAB QUIZ Today on PVC-T Lab.

Today, we'll look at the idea of rolling in a couple other ways, including imagining rolling WITH slipping. We'll investigate the motion of a hula hoop as it skates across the floor. The worksheet is due and will be collected next class! 

With any time remaining, you should finish any outstanding AP Problems that you have not done to this point.  If you've already finished all of the AP problems, we'll work on review problems for the exam: Ch 10 #81, Ch 11 #25, 35, 36, 39 with a special focus on angular momentum.  

Handout:  Hula-Hoop Problem
Homework:  Definitely finish all energy problems, and try to finish the momentum problems too. Test is Tuesday, December 11th.  

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